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Sunday, October 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Evolutionary change and heterochrony found in the catalog.

Evolutionary change and heterochrony

Evolutionary change and heterochrony

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  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Wiley in Chichester, England, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Heterochrony (Biology)

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statementedited by Kenneth J. McNamara.
    ContributionsMcNamara, Ken.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQH395 .E96 1995
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 286 p. :
    Number of Pages286
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1275029M
    ISBN 100471958379
    LC Control Number95006588

    Heterochrony (from the Greek hetero meaning "other" and chronos meaning "time") describes a change in the timing of ontogenetic events between two taxa. These can be the result of relatively small genetic changes that may not even be alterations in DNA sequence, but in the timing of particular genes being expressed during development. of heterochrony. These approaches, along with papers on methodological issues, are also represented in Devel-opment, Growth and Evolution. So how are we doing? Let us start with heterochrony, first formulated explicitly by Haeckel in , and re-vived almost single-handedly by the late Steven Jay Gould’s landmark book, Ontogeny and.

    Heterotopy is an evolutionary change in the spatial arrangement of an animal's embryonic development, complementary to heterochrony, a change to the rate or timing of a development process. It was first identified by Ernst Haeckel in and has remained less well studied than heterochrony.   Heterochrony, evolutionary change in developmental rate or relative timing of developmental events, plays a key role in the transformation of morphology in evolutionary time [1–5] and can play an important role in both the origin and evolutionary diversification of complex phenotypes [6, 7].Heterochrony may occur at the level of the whole organism, or among Cited by:

    Once the biogenetic law was proven untrue, heterochrony underwent a change in its definition, acquiring the comparative meaning that is still in use. Gavin De Beer defined heterochrony as the evolutionary change in the developmental timing of a feature relative to the same feature in an ancestor (or in a related species) (De Beer, ).Cited by: 3. Heterochrony A heterochronic change is, in general, a change in the rate or timing of development of some cell lines in the body relative to others. A mutation that alters the rate at which a cell line develops relative to other cell lines is a heterochronic mutation.


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Evolutionary change and heterochrony Download PDF EPUB FB2

In looking beyond heterochrony, this book attends to a variety of explanations for evolutionary development.

The chapters present theoretical and practical approaches with real data, using examples from both extant and extinct forms of animal and plant life to present refreshing and at times divergent perspectives on the : Hardcover. Evolutionary change and heterochrony.

[Ken McNamara;] -- Recent studies have shown that relative changes in the rates and timing of growth during ontogeny, known as heterochrony, play a significant role in evolution. Mencken, High and Ghostly Matters, Prejudices: Fourth Series () Where would evolution be, Without this thing, heterochrony.

McKinney () One of the joys of working in a renascent field is that it is actually possible to keep up with the literature. Much of this growth arose from Steven Jay Gould's book, Ontogeny and Phylogeny, published in Gould's and many subsequent works concentrated on heterochrony – the change in the timing or Author: K Evolutionary change and heterochrony book Smith.

*immediately available upon purchase as print book shipments may be delayed due to the COVID crisis. ebook access is temporary and does not include ownership of the ebook. Only valid for books with an ebook version.

By L Godfrey, Published on 01/01/ Recommended Citation. Godfrey, L, "Evolutionary change and heterochrony." ().Author: L Godfrey. He concludes, “Throughout this book, I have tried to demonstrate that heterochrony is extremely important in evolutionboth in frequency of occurrence and as the basis of significant evolutionary change.

I hope that I have added thereby some support for the belief that alterations in regulation form the major stuff of evolutionary by:   It has been suggested that some significant steps in evolution, such as the evolution of vertebrates, were engendered by heterochrony. Human evolution was fuelled by heterochrony, with some traits, such as a large brain, being peramorphic, whereas others, such as reduced jaw size, are by: It has been suggested that some significant steps in evolution, such as the evolution of vertebrates, were engendered by heterochrony.

Human evolution was fuelled by heterochrony, with some traits, such as a large brain, being peramorphic, whereas others, such as reduced jaw size, are by: Heterochrony refers to an evolutionary change in the temporal organization of organisms' life cycles (SmithNicoglou This includes changes in the onset and offset of developmental.

Heterochrony, broadly defined, refers to evolutionary change in the rate or timing of development. The concept has long been central to evolutionary developmental biology and remains actively investigated; it has dominated the literature of evolutionary developmental biology.

The connection between development and evolution has become the focus of an increasing amount of research in recent years, and heterochrony has long been a key concept in this relation. Heterochrony is defined as evolutionary change in rates and timing of developmental processes; the dimension of time is therefore an essential part in studies of by:   Heterochrony in Evolution by Michael L.

McKinney,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(2). Heterochrony, or a change in developmental timing, is an important mechanism of evolutionary change.

Historically the concept of heterochrony has focused alternatively on changes in size and shape or changes in developmental sequence, but most have focused on the pattern of by: Heterochrony Heterochrony is a change in the timing of developmental events.

For example, a change in timing might slow down the development of the body, but not alter the maturation of the reproductive system. This change yields an adult organism with a. Heterochrony, change in developmental rate and timing, is widely recognized as an agent of evolutionary change. Heterotopy, evolutionary change in spatial patterning of.

BOOK REVIEW Changing Times, Changing Places: Heterochrony and Heterotopy Beyond Heterochrony: The Evolution of Development. Edited by Miriam Zelditch. Wiley-Liss, New York.

pages. Cloth $ The odyssey of heterochrony is exceedingly cu-rious (Gould p. Almost a quarter of a century ago a paper. II. Introduction Heterochrony, a change in the relative timing and/or rate of developmental processes in a descendant relative to its ancestor, has become one of the most popular developmental and evolutionary topics in recent years.

Michael W. Hart and Gregory A. Wray Many examples discussed in other chapters of this book could be identified as heterochronies. Others have pointed out that almost any evolutionary change in development can formally be defined as a heterochrony (Hall, ; Raff, ). The chapters in Human Evolution through Developmental Change reflect two major strands of research in the study of human heterochrony, the change in the timing and rate of development of individuals.

First, paleoanthropological evidence culled from the remains of infant and juvenile hominid fossils held in the world's museums has provided. Evolutionary innovations—the bony skeleton of vertebrates, avian flight, or the insect pollination system of angiosperms, for example—have in recent years become the focus of much fertile new research in evolutionary biology.

Innovations may hold the keys to understanding why whole new groups of organisms evolve or.Also, if you significantly change your book, it is considered a new edition and should be published as a new book.

If you make minor changes, it's considered the same edition. Note: If you use Author Central, changes to your main author name or description made through your KDP Bookshelf will update automatically on Author Central within 24 hours.Presently, heterochrony is considered as a process affecting the origin and evolution of larval forms.

Discussions of heterochrony rarely distinguish patterns from processes, and heterochronic patterns are defined as paedomorphosis, truncation of development of a trait relative to development of the trait in an ancestor; or peramorphosis.